Vegan In Vegas May21

Vegan In Vegas

There are many things that come to mind when I think of Las Vegas.  Rarely do I think of good vegetarian food.  It wasn’t until I read an article about highly successful vegans that I discovered that Steve Wynn — owner of the famous Wynn Resort in Las Vegas– was vegan and served vegan food in his hotels. My travels rarely take me to Vegas.  There is so much there that is bothersome and degrading to the mind and spirit, that I find very few reasons for wanting to visit.  Sometimes, as I child, our family stayed over for a day or two when heading to the Grand Canyon or when my brother and I accompanied my dad on work-related trips.  On occasional road trips from California to Michigan, I drove through, but never stopped.  However, recently, on a trip out west: Judy, the boys, and I met my side of the family in Vegas for a Mother’s Day get-together.  We took some extra time to visit some top veggie-friendly restaurants and compare the creative approaches of the nation’s best chefs with Adventist Cuisine. With little time and money to spend in Vegas, I was trying to figure out the best approach of maximizing both.  Thankfully, I came across a blog by Las Vegas vegan expert Paul Graham.  I emailed Paul to get advice on places to go, places not to go, and anything else that would be helpful in making decisions on where to eat.  He replied with two emails, allowed me to drop his name at key places, and led me to some of the best places to eat.  I’m planning on purchasing his book. Although this adventure had fun components, I was very serious about trying to learn more about the role...

Amazing Thanksgiving Recipes...

VEGAN TURKEY   Are you a vegetarian that’s tired of using Tofurkey and don’t have the skills to make a fake turkey of your own?  The GARDIN, in my opinion, is the best option out there for veggie turkey.  Overall, this is the best way to do turkey because it’s pretty fast, it tastes good, and it’s an all-inclusive veggie product. For our meal we glazed it with honey (1/4 cup), soy sauce (2 teaspoons), lemon juice of a lemon, and orange zest of an orange.  Cook it until it reduces by half. We plated it over a thinly sliced potato and steamed carrots and green beans. For the gravy, we used the packet sauce and cooked it in the pot where we made the glaze.  We added and handful of wild mushrooms (add your favorite), and heated until mushrooms were cooked.      HOLIDAY TRIO Inspired by an article on Thanksgiving, we wanted to ensure that this year’s holiday meal had more fresh foods, healthier portions, and non-traditional components that included our Mexican and Korean backgrounds.  We made three dishes: Mock Chicken Wings in a Saffron-Pomegranate Glaze with a Mole Sauce and Jicama Kimchi on a homemade tortilla chip Mock Chicken Wings in a spicy Korean Barbecue Glaze with fresh Mexican Chayote Squash and radish Mock Turkey in a Honey-Lemon Glaze with traditional Wild Mushroom Gravy on a fried potato and steamed carrots and green beans Mole Growing up, Mole was one of my favorite mexican dishes.  It’s dark color, and earthy taste somehow reminds me of the Harvest Season.  I thought that pomegranate was a good fruit to use in a glaze for several reasons.  First, it reminded me of my childhood days when we used to eat them from my Aunt’s backyard tree.  Secondly, it...

AWE & WORSHIP

When He had come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed Him.  And behold, a leper came and worshiped Him, saying, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.” Then Jesus put out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.”Immediately his leprosy was cleansed. (Matthew 8:1-3) The Story Jesus has just finished preaching the greatest sermon ever.  His philosophy is so radical and counter-influencial to the norms of the time and to the scribes’ powerless religiosity that the crowd responds with awe and amazement.  Christ’s message has made such an impact on the listeners that they become instant followers.  When He had come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed Him. As the scene changes from the mountain to the valley, a new figure emerges.  The text does not indicate whether or not this man had heard the words of Christ on the mountain — it only describes him as a leper seeking healing. The Question The story begs the question: Could it be that there are those who follow Christ, are in His very presence, partake of the privilege that His presence provides: astonishment, and yet miss the greatest blessing that His presences ought to bring? The Differences It is important to note the difference between the leper and the crowd.  Both of them are in the presence of Christ, but the crowd is following Him.  In other words, the crowd has been with Him.  The leper, on the other hand, is only now coming to Jesus.  The crowd is following Christ because they are astonished.  The leper is coming to Christ because he wants to worship Him. The Lessons It is possible to “follow” Christ, be in His presence, and yet not worship Him.  Although worship and awe are often closely associated, it is dreadful to mistake them for being the same thing.  To be in awe of God is not worship.  It can be part of worship.  It can lead to worship.  It can result from worship, but seeking the presence of God and following purely out of astonishment misses the bigger picture.  It is true, God craves our presence more than anything else in this world.  He proved this very point by cashing out heaven’s bank account for this very possibility.  However, more important than being in the presence of Christ is worshipping Him — taking advantage of the opportunity that being in His presence brings.  God desires our presence because His presence is supposed to transform us from sick people, to those who walk in newness of life. The ultimate difference between the leper who worships and the crowd who seeks Christ’s presence is that the leper’s outcome is transformation while the crowd is simply more astonished.  To be content with astonishment — even the astonishment of Christ — is to miss out in the greater blessing that God seeks to bestow. The Appeal  Seventh-day Adventists need to evaluate whether our worship is producing personal transformation.  Otherwise, no matter how much we talk about Jesus, how much we claim that we are in His presence, how strongly we believe ourselves to be His followers; we are slowly dying of thirst while in the very presence of the Spring of Living...

Two In One: Denominational & Self-supporting Ministry Oct02

Two In One: Denominational & Self-supporting Ministry...

In the history of Adventism, there are several instances where self-supporting work led the way in opening up opportunities for the church to do its work.   In 1848 at the five Sabbath Conferences, early Seventh-day Adventists began to understand the truths that formed some of Adventism’s core foundation.  Those who gathered felt a deep burden and responsibility to spread the message to others.  But they faced several major challenges.  First, their numbers were few.  How could a small group of people make a large impact; how could they make a significant impression on the hearts of those they were trying to reach?  The task was large.  The responsibility they felt was to preach the “Present Truth” – the fact that Christ was coming again for the second time, that the seventh-day Sabbath was still binding, the fullness of understanding the message of the third angel in Revelation 14, Christ’s ministry in the heavenly sanctuary, and the non-immortality of the soul.  Their endeavor to teach others such necessary biblical truths was, indeed, a very large task.  Not only were their numbers few and their task large; but the small group of believers had another significant challenge to deal with: they were poor and widely separated.  They had very little means to sustain themselves and working together was challenging because they did not have the benefit of being close together.  All of the above combined to add, perhaps the biggest challenge of all: communication.   But the small band did not give up.  They accomplished their tasks as best as they could.  They did this in two key ways.  First, they did it through spoken word as they personally went out conducting visitations.  Secondly, when it was possible for them to do so, they preached....

Kimchi Fried Rice

It’s a great way to use leftover rice, frozen veggies and kimchi that’s “on the verge” — too old or too strong to be used as a fresh ingredient.  It wasn’t until Kimmy Shin, CAMPUS Chaplain at Michigan Tech University, reintroduced me to this great dish that I began to really like it and want to make it. One of my favorite parts about this dish, also called: bokumbap, is that it reminds me of a childhood favorite dish from back in the day.  Sometimes, my mom worked overtime and didn’t come home until late at night.  I’d grab some leftover mexican rice from the weekend, throw it in the microwave, fry an egg, and mix it all together in a dish with avocado.  It was rich and savory and I enjoyed eating it so much! We don’t eat eggs at home much.  However, whenever we get some for whatever reason, I like to save at least one to make this dish.  This time, instead of using mexican rice, I fry up some kimchi — a type of pickled korean cabbage, throw in some frozen veggies, add old rice, and cook everything over high heat to add a little crunch to the rice and caramelization to the veggies and kimchi.  It’s not the healthiest dish in the world, but I think it’s one of the best tasting!  For vegans, if you take away the egg, you still have a good fried rice...